FAQ

Last change on 2022-05-13 • Created on 2020-07-02

What are the dedicated vCPU server plans?

Every dedicated vCPU instance has its own dedicated CPU resources (1 vCPU = 1 hyper-thread), so these CCX servers offer you predictably high CPU performance. We recommend them for systems with high production loads and CPU intensive applications. They are only available with local (NVMe SSD) storage. They utilize the same high-performance hardware as our other Hetzner Cloud servers, with a generous allocation of I/O and network power.

Of course, all the other Hetzner Cloud features you know and love are also available for these dedicated vCPU instances. Using the rescale feature on the administration interface Cloud Console, you can up- and downgrade the CCX servers depending on how many resources you require.

Please note that our System Policies at https://www.hetzner.com/rechtliches/cloud-server/ also apply to our dedicated vCPU instances.

What is the difference between local and Ceph disks for servers on the CX models?

Ceph models are no longer available.

Local storage has always offered superior storage performance and latency while being on the same level of stability, making them the best choice for all of our customers.

How can i get a custom ISO?

For this, please send us a direct download link to your desired file via support request. Please note that we cannot provide OS which have already reached End-of-Life.

Can I use Cloud-Init when creating servers?

While creating your server, you can inject cloud-init user data. This means you can make your server execute special commands while booting, like creating users or running a shell command.

Example:

#!/bin/bash
touch /tmp/cloudinit_was_here

For more examples see https://help.ubuntu.com/community/CloudInit and https://cloudinit.readthedocs.io/en/latest/topics/examples.html

In order for cloud-init to work, you must use the system images we provide as they include a special cloud-init datasource.

Can I pick my Backup time?

In the past there used to be an option to pick a time yourself, however, we had to deactivate this feature. This allows us to better spread the additional load caused by running Backups throughout the day. It was necessary because many users picked the same time, causing performance repercussions and negatively impacting server performance during certain times of the day.

You can use our Snapshot feature if you want to precisely control when your disk gets saved.

How can I increase the primary disk of my cloud server?

Cloud servers primary disks are bound to their respective package. In order to increase the primary disk, you have to Rescale the server.

How can i reset my server to its delivery state?

In order to reset the server to its delivery state, please select the server and then Rebuild. Next, select and restore the desired OS.

Important note: All saved data will be lost.

Rebuild

How can I reset my root password ?

First select your Project then the Server. In the left overview click on Rescue. At the bottom of the page you will find a button called "Reset Root Password".

Root-Reset

Is root password authentication disabled on servers that are created with an SSH key?

With most of the older operating systems, you can set a root password, even if you created your server with an SSH key. Newer versions of most operating systems (e.g. Debian 11, Ubuntu 22.04) recognized the vulnerability to brute force attacks that comes with this approach and disabled password authentication for the root user by default.

If you still want to enable password authentication, you can change the settings as explained below, for example:

nano /etc/ssh/sshd_config
  • Root passwort authentication is disabled

    PermitRootLogin prohibit-password
  • Root passwort authentication is allowed

    PermitRootLogin yes

How can I reinstall a server?

We recommend deleting the server completely and creating a new one instead. This ensures that all settings are new and up to date. It is also quite likely that the new server will have the same IP address that the deleted server used to have.

How can I access the server I rebuilt?

Assume you have rebuilt your server server1 from a Snapshot called snap1.

Case 1: Server1 was originally created without selecting an SSH key:

After rebuild, a new root password for server1 will be generated and mailed to you. It will be set on first boot using the cloud-init mechanism.

If snap1 contained injected SSH keys, these will also continue to work.

Case 2: Server1 was created with selecting your SSH key key1:

After rebuild, the key key1 will be injected into server1 on first boot using the cloud-init mechanism. You can use key1 to access your server.

If snap1 contained any more keys in its authorized_keys file, you can also still use these to access server1.

In all cases, server1 cannot be accessed using a root password directly after the rebuild, even if one was set in snap1.

Case 1 and Case 2 only apply if you restore a Snapshot that was taken from our officially provided images. If you used the rescue system or other means to install the server snap1 was taken from, it will not be fit for reconfiguration via cloud-init, and its behavior might be different.

Why has the disk partition remained the same after rescaling?

You have to manually resize the partition via Rescue System after the Rescale has been completed. Following community article can help further in this case: https://community.hetzner.com/tutorials/resize-ext-partition?title=Resize_Ext_Partition/en

Can I virtualize further on cloud servers, or rather is nested virtualzation possible?

No, this is not possible on cloud server.

While creating a new server, I have selected a Snapshot as source image. How can I access this server?

Assume you have created your server server1 from a Snapshot called snap1.

Case 1: You did not select an SSH key while creating server1:

After server creation, a root password for access will be generated and mailed to you. It will be set using the cloud-init mechanism.

If snap1 contained injected SSH keys, these will also continue to work.

Case 2: You selected SSH key key1 while creating server1:

After server creation, the key key1 will be injected into server1 using the cloud-init mechanism. You can use key1 to access your server.

If snap1 contained any more keys in its authorized_keys file, you can also still use these to access server1.

In all cases server1 cannot be accessed using a root password directly after its creation, even if one was set in snap1.

Case 1 and Case 2 only apply if you use a Snapshot that was taken from our officially provided images. If you used the rescue system or other means to install the server snap1 was taken from, it will not be fit for reconfiguration via cloud-init, and its behavior might be different.

The keyboard mapping in the console window seems to be wrong. How can I fix this?

All of our images come with keyboard mapping set for a US keyboard. If you have something different, you need to configure it yourself within your server.

For example, on Ubuntu you can do so by running

sudo dpkg-reconfigure keyboard-configuration

and selecting the keyboard layout you are using on your local PC. After a reboot, the keyboard mapping in the console will be correct.

How do I protect my server from being deleted by accident?

Servers, Snapshots and Floating IPs can be protected in the Cloud Console and API.

Before you can delete a protected resource, you have to deactivate the deletion protection. This provides an additional safeguard for accidental deletion.

Protected resources are indicated by a lock icon on the server, Snapshot and Floating IP overview page. You can't use the "Rebuild" feature to reinstall a protected server.

How many servers can I create?

Each customer has a default limit for the number of cloud resources that we simultaneously provide. If you would like to increase your limit, you can send a request to our support team by opening a support ticket via Cloud Console. Our team will quickly review your request and, if everything is in order, they will increase your limit.

What does it mean if an image is marked as deprecated?

When creating a server, you can select from a list of pre-made operating system images, such as Debian version 10. When the end of the lifecycle of this specific image version comes closer, we will mark it as deprecated.

This means that the image is still available. However, we will remove it in the future.

We will keep images marked as deprecated for at least another 3 months after the deprecation date. After that period, they may become unavailable at any time.

Why can I not send any mails from my server?

Unfortunately, email spammers and scammers like to use cloud hosting providers. And we at Hetzner naturally want to prevent this. That's why we block ports 25 and 465 by default on all cloud servers. This is a very common practice in the cloud hosting industry because it prevents abuse. We want to build trust with our new customers before we unblock these mail ports. Once you have been with us for a month and paid your first invoice, you can create a limit request to unblock these ports for a valid use case. In your request, you can tell us details about your use case. We make decisions on a case-by-case basis.

As an alternative, you can also use port 587 to send emails via external mail delivery services. Port 587 is not blocked and can be used without sending a limit request.

I can not reach my instance / I have two default routes. How can I fix this?

A bug in hc-utils caused NetworkManager to manage the private network interface and therefore installs a wrong default route.

We have published an updated hc-utils package. After the update got installed, the wrong default route should not get installed anymore.

The updated hc-utils is available here:

RHEL / CentOS / Rocky 8: https://packages.hetzner.com/hcloud/rpm/hc-utils-0.0.4-1.el8.noarch.rpm
Fedora 34/35: https://packages.hetzner.com/hcloud/rpm/hc-utils-0.0.4-1.fc34.noarch.rpm

I have added my SSH key to the Cloud Console, why can I not access my existing server via my SSH key?

When creating a new server, you can select an SSH key that will automatically be added to the server. Instead of a password, this key is then used to authenticate on that server. Unfortunately, we cannot add SSH keys to existing servers. On those, you will have to add your SSH key manually. The community article Setting up an SSH key, for example, explains how to do this in step 4.

Why are no hard disks and/or network interfaces recognised when installing my custom BSD distribution (eg. pfsense or opensese)?

Cloud servers of the CPX series use a chipset by default, which has incompatibilities with a few BSD-based distributions. Please contact the support for a change of the chipset.

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